Never Say Goat-Bye

It’s taken me a while to be able to write this post because I am truly heartbroken to report I am no longer a goat ma. Now don’t you worry about Pasqualina! She is just fine and happily living with a small herd nearby (not even really a herd, just a few friends), but the fact that she isn’t with me makes me so, so sad.

Pasqualina and me

It all started last summer when there was some hullaballoo about keeping “farm” animals in the village. Even though this has been something that has been going on in this rural southern Italian village for centuries, it became an issue for reasons (certain people) I’m not going to get into. It didn’t directly have to do with us or Pasqualina, but it eventually landed at our doorstep, so to speak. We moved her around a bit to try to make do, but then my daughter was born in October of last year, and well, things got even more challenging with Pasqualina just a bit farther away than she always had been. I hardly ever even got to see her, in fact, because it was just too difficult for me to get there with the baby.

And so, we made an excruciatingly difficult decision to rehome her. She’s in *extremely* good hands, so at least that is not a worry, and technically I could visit her from time to time if I wanted. I haven’t been able to bring myself to do that yet, though, as I’m afraid I’ll blubber like a baby when I see her and when I have to leave her again.

Pasqualina and me

I raised this special goatie from when she was just a wee kid when we weren’t sure whether she would make it because she wouldn’t take a bottle. But I persisted and she was an amazing companion to me for five years. Right now, I feel like I’ve let her down and failed her as a caretaker, though I doubt she feels that way – she always was a forgiving goat as her maaaaa felt her way through goat husbandry on the fly.

Wee Pasqualina and me

It’s not out of the realm of possibility that we would be able to take her in again at some point, but it’s not likely in the near future. And honestly, so long as she’s happy and thriving where she’s at, I’d rather not move her again and further stress her as she gets up there in goat years.

What does this mean for Goat Berries? I won’t be posting very much on the blog itself, though I do plan to keep the site online and also stay relatively active in the goat community on Facebook (including continuing to post on the Goat Berries Facebook page).

So, no, this is not goat-bye . . . but it is taking a lot to get used to life without my Pasqualina.

*wipes away tears, again*

Pasqualina

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16 Responses to “Never Say Goat-Bye”
  1. Mary Leonardi Cattolica
    04.08.2014

    My heart is breaking.

    [Reply]

    michelle Reply:

    Thank you, Mary xx

    [Reply]

  2. 04.08.2014

    Oh I am sad for you but I completely understand. I’m glad you are doing what is best for the goat and you. So many don’t consider how their animal, whether it’s dog, cat or goat, when the need to re-home arises. I’ve always enjoyed the goat tales you’ve shared as well as the pics. Thanks for letting us into this piece of your life.

    [Reply]

    michelle Reply:

    Thank you, Michelle – it’s been a pleasure to share my goat adventures! xx

    [Reply]

  3. 04.08.2014

    Tears…

    [Reply]

  4. 04.08.2014

    Oh Michelle … I’m so sorry!! It’s so good that you know where she’s at and that it’s a good home. But it’s still such a big parting! :-(

    [Reply]

  5. Gil
    04.09.2014

    Why did I go searching, instead of going to sleep? Now I’m sad for you and P. Your neighbors are just as bad as the people in the towns around Hartford, Connecticut where they have been giving people hard times about their pet goats, chickens, etc… I guess it is good that you found a home for her before Marissa got old enough to become attached to her.

    [Reply]

  6. michelle
    04.10.2014

    Ironically, it wasn’t our neighbors at all – they all loved her. It was someone complaining about pigs in a different part of the village, and it was mostly a trickle down effect to us. Maybe we’ll have other goats for M to know someday (but no one will ever be Pasqualina) :(

    [Reply]

  7. michelle
    04.10.2014

    Thank you Laura xx

    [Reply]

  8. michelle
    04.10.2014

    *sniff sniff*

    [Reply]

  9. 04.12.2014

    Transitions, that’s what life is all about for us humans as well as for our goat-family herd.
    Not that is makes it any easier, of course! -sigh-

    I love goofy goats!
    peace

    [Reply]

    michelle Reply:

    Thank you Laura :)

    [Reply]

  10. 05.06.2014

    She looks so cute. I am so sad for you. I have been tempted to have some goats in the field next to our house but have been a bit put off by the cost of making it a goat-proof enclosure.

    [Reply]

  11. michelle
    05.06.2014

    Thanks Tom; I hope you decide in favor of the goaties…there’s nothing like having them around!

    [Reply]

  12. michelle
    05.06.2014

    Thank you Joanna xx

    [Reply]

  13. 06.09.2014

    Oh Michelle, I am so sorry and upset for you. I just love Pasqualina, and I have never even met her in person. So sad. I am glad she is in a good place though.

    [Reply]


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